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Author Topic: Iron On Transfers  (Read 475 times)

TheLezlie

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Iron On Transfers
« on: January 20, 2018, 08:59:59 AM »
I purchased a pattern a long time ago for a fabric doll. I have made lots of 'rag dolls' in the past, however this one is different in many ways. It comes with an iron-on transfer to be used for the eyes. There is only one set of eyes included, however I want to make more than one doll, and I'm not about to spend the money for a new pattern each time I want to make same doll. The transfer seems to be very light (perhaps faded as the pattern is likely several years old?), so not sure how well it would copy in the first place, even if it is possible?
Does anyone know how to duplicate an iron-on transfer before it is used? I guess alternatively the eyes could be painted on (however, I'm not sure if such paint would come off if played with/slobbered on by a toddler?), or embroidered by hand, but I would have no idea how to do eyes with the range of coloring in an eyeball? Could it be reprinted even by a professional printing house?
Thank you for any ideas!


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Re: Iron On Transfers
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 09:00:20 AM »
How detailed is this transfer? Are we talking photorealism or Raggedy Ann? You can do photorealistic eyes with machine thread painting techniques, hand embroidery, or fabric painting, but they all require a fair amount of patience.

The iron on transfer sheets you can make with an ink jet printer and special paper tend to be fairly pastel when transferred to fabric. But that may be the easiest way to do it. If you took a good photo of the transfer before use, you could intensify the colors in a program like Photoshop or GIMP, then print all the transfers you want.

Have you found Dharmatrading.com? It is a website loaded with information on how to get color onto fabric with dyes, paints, markers, transfers, crayons, etc. And they sell the supplies to do so with information on using the products. And lots of books and DVDs with more how-tos. I have bought lots of things from them over the years and found them reputable and helpful. And yes, there are fabric paints that toddlers would be unlikely to be able to damage if properly set.

mistycruzin

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Re: Iron On Transfers
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 09:02:39 AM »
I used iron-on transfer paper for my ink jet printer many years ago. I think that would work here as well. Here is a link to what JoAnn sells. You can probably also find it at Walmart or Staples.

http://www.joann.com/crafts-hobbies/fabric-crafting/photo-transfer-screen-printing/

Depending on the type of printer you have (I have an all in one printer that scans, faxes, and copies as well), you could scan the image and upload it to your computer. Then print the image onto the transfer paper. Perhaps you can even print multiple sets of "eyes" onto a single sheet. Test print onto plain paper. You may have to use the mirror image function when printing.

westvillian

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Re: Iron On Transfers
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2018, 09:03:35 AM »
Some transfers look rather dusty until they're transferred. They usually give you some extra motifs so you can experiment with time and temperature and fiber to get a good transfer. I think I'd probably at least store a good photo of the transfer before using it.

Some of the copy places will produce transfers for you, but they tend to be really sticky about copyright permissions.

If you're feeling creative, it can get a little expensive... but so much fun! Check the techniques tab on the website, too.

June Moran

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Re: Iron On Transfers
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2018, 09:04:04 AM »
I have used paint, (the dollar store stuff works fine, if you use a good "fabric extender". I have used embroidery, crayons (real wax) and markers. All of these work great, but in all cases you must do samples first. I always duplicate the transfer and if there is only one!!! I would never use the original.
Happy Doll Making!

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Re: Iron On Transfers
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2018, 09:05:33 AM »
Print your pattern on paper. Unthread the sewing machine and put in a large, dead needle. Set up for a long straight stitch and "sew" the design. Pin the perforated pattern to the fabric that will be embroidered and pounce the design. Connect the dots with hand basting or pencil or washout marker or chalk. Embroider.

OR

light box

OR

freehand

OR

transfer pen or pencil

OR

trace onto thin embroidery stabilizer that can be torn, heated or washed away on completion.

It really depends on the substrate you are working on.