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Author Topic: Sewing ripped coat lining  (Read 10531 times)

yourstrulyalex

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Sewing ripped coat lining
« on: January 17, 2018, 03:59:36 PM »
Hi, sorry did not know where to post this. But my new coat, the lining just ripped in one spot, a long seam. How is the best way to repair this? Darn, how do I actually get this under the sewing machine? Should I hand mend it? Thank you for any help!

Administrator

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Re: Sewing ripped coat lining
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 04:01:05 PM »
Did the lining rip or did the seam come apart? If the seam came apart, there's a way into the inside of the lining, often through a hole in the sleeve seam. But it's often easier just to hand sew a busted lining seam the last few inches that you can't get from the outside with a machine with hand stitching. I usually use something like a baseball stitch:
http://www.wrtcleather.com/1-ckd/tutorials/baseball-2.gif

Or, if you're not horribly particular, you can just fold the seam allowance back to the inside and edgestitch that lining seam closed on the sewing machine, and your lining will wind up being maybe 1/8" smaller in circumference.

If, however, the fabric is torn, then it's probably weak (unless you've got my Harriet, the cat who climbs up the insides of coats if you're not watching!). And you may really want to reline the coat properly with something stronger.

If it's a new-to-you coat rather than brand new, me, myself and I would probably try to put a fused patch of tricot on the back of the lining and then go over it with a three step zigzag, like I'm doing mending jeans here: http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/album/view/24395076 Know that you're in for replacing the lining by next year, most likely. Another posibility might be a mending tape like K-tape: https://www.amazon.com/Kenyon-K-Tape-Repair-Tape-Ripstop/dp/B00PUCH70E

But first... you say "my new coat".... if it is indeed a new or nearly new coat, then I would take it back to where you bought it for an exchange because of a defective process or fabric. Or I would look for the manufacturer -- somewhere there's probably a tag with an "RIN Number":
https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/selected-industries/registered-identification-number-database and hit them up for either a repair or replacement.

oddesy

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Re: Sewing ripped coat lining
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2018, 04:01:42 PM »
Should you need to go this route, the current Threads magazine has an article on how to replace the lining of a coat.

JCarroll217

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Re: Sewing ripped coat lining
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2018, 04:02:41 PM »
I'm working on several alterations of wool & leather coats right now.

Typically, on the underside of one of the sleeves, you'll see stitching. That's the way into the inside of the coat.

I'm now working on a beautifully made Cinzia Rocca Virgin Wool coat. That designer has the "outside" stitching along the bottom hem. So, you may have to look for it - but it's always there!

When a lining is inserted, it's done right sides facing together & then everything's turned around. That's why a little line of stitching is inconspicuously on the lining where the final seam is closed up.

Believe me, you can turn your whole coat inside out through that opening!!! Just go slow. Then, re-stitch the opened seam & turn the whole coat back through that opening & restitch the outside seam.

Wah-La!

westvillian

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Re: Sewing ripped coat lining
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2018, 04:03:08 PM »
I just deconstructed an old linen jacket I owned. I was amazed at how many seams were being held together with less than a 1/16" seam allowance on one side or the other.

Finding the opening where the factory turned the lining may not provide the best access for repair. (The opening on the linen jacket was at the neckline).

If the hole is in the front or back body, I'd go in thru the hem if it has an overlap (most do). If you don't feel confident with your handstitches, the overlap will cover them - plus you can open it up as much as you need to comfortably make the repair.

Just another option.